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2021 Seed Selection for the Cut Flower Garden

Follow along as I share the seeds I selected for my 2021 cut flower garden.

After reading all my journal notes and looking at pictures from last summer, I made a final decision as to which seeds I would be ordering for the 2021 garden.

It wasn’t easy! I had to go back through my wish list 3 times to make cuts before finalizing my seed order.

seedling being transplanted in garden

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cottage garden

I am a loyal customer of Floret Flower Farm. The love affair started when I bought Erin’s Cut Flower Garden book and decided to build a raised bed garden for cut flowers and a greenhouse after reading it.

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Check out my favorite supplies and tools for starting seeds indoors. Whether you’re looking for grow lights or a seed starting mix, you’ll find what I use in my own greenhouse.


seed packets

The recommended sow dates are on the back of the seed packets. I am in hardiness zone 8b with an average last frost date of April 18th.

Here are the seeds I am growing this year, in order of the seed sowing date.

Sweet Peas

I sow my sweet pea seeds indoors 10-12 weeks before the last frost and plant them in the ground after any threat of frost. Be sure to plant next to a support, like a trellis, to support the vines as they will climb 6-8″.

I’ve chosen 4 varieties this year.


Snapdragon seeds can be started indoors 8-10 weeks before the last frost. Sow seeds indoors in trays and transplant them once the weather has warmed.

Black-Eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans generally bloom from June to October and add such a pop of color to the garden when most flowers are already spent in early fall.

larkspur in garden

Larkspur

This is one of the easiest cut flowers to grow and is cold-tolerant and early to bloom.

Direct seed in late fall or early spring, or start seed indoors in trays 6-8 weeks before the last frost and plant out while the weather is still cool.

larkspur
Larkspur ‘Summer Skis Mix’ Photo credit Floret Flowers

They do best when sown directly in the garden. To speed up germination, put the seeds in the freezer a week before sowing.

pincushion
Pincushion Flower ‘Summer Sangria’ Photo credit Floret Flowers

Pincushion Flower

These flowers are hardy annuals that are easy to grow. Pollinators love them, too! Start seeds indoors in trays 6-8 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed.  

strawflower in garden

Strawflowers

These cut flowers look beautiful both fresh and dried and have a papery type bloom. Pollinators love them.

Start seeds indoors in trays 6 weeks before the last frost. The seeds require light to germinate, so be sure not to cover. Bottom water until seedlings emerge. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed.  

apricot strawflower
Strawflower ‘Apricot Mix’
Statice ‘Sunset Mix’ 

Statice

These blooms are considered one of the best flowers to use dry and are so easy to grow. It has papery flowers that bloom over a long period.

Start seeds indoors 6 weeks before the last frost and transplant out when all danger of frost has passed.

basil cinnamon
Basil ‘Cinnamon’

Basil

This is a great filler for bouquets and has a wonderful scent.

Start seeds indoors in trays 6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed. Basil is very sensitive to cold, so wait until the weather has warmed to plant out.

marigolds
Marigold ‘Tangerine Gem’

Marigolds

Each marigold plant produces 15-20 branching stems that reach over 24 inches. 

Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed. Marigolds can also be direct seeded once the weather has warmed.

Zinnias

Zinnias are easy to grow and are one of the longest-lasting bloomers in the garden. They are easy to grow and great for beginners.

Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed. Zinnias can also be direct seeded once the weather has warmed.

Zinnia ‘Queen Lime Blush’
double click mix cosmos

Cosmos

Cosmos are very productive per square foot. What I love about these blooms, is the more you cut, the more they bloom.

Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed. Cosmos can also be direct seeded once the weather has warmed.

globe amaranth
Globe Amaranth ‘Sunset Mix’

Globe Amaranth

This late summer bloom is another favorite, because the more you cut it, the more it blooms. They make a great dried flower as well. I love mixing it in with my dahlias late in the season.

Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed.

Lupine ‘Sunrise’

Lupine

To keep lupine flowers blooming, pinch early and pick hard. Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed.

Succession plant every 2-3 weeks for continual harvest.  

tickseed
Tickseed ‘Incredible’ Photo credit Floret Flowers

Tickseed

Tickseed is a wonderful filler for a floral bouquet. Beneficial insects love it. Start seeds indoors in trays 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Transplant out after all danger of frost has passed. Can direct seed.

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‘Growing a Cut Flower Garden’ Series


bee's friend
Bee’s Friend Photo credit Floret Flowers

Bee’s Friend

This special flower is one of the most pollinator and beneficial insect-friendly flowers that you can grow. Direct seed in the spring as soon as the danger of frost has passed.

Cover seeds with soil as they need darkness to germinate.

eucalyptus
Eucalyptus ‘Baby Blue’ Photo credit Floret Flowers

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is a late-season filler and can be grown as an annual from seed if started early. Sow seed on the surface of the soil and do not cover. Seeds are very slow to germinate and take 45 days to sprout.

Sunflower Frilly

Sunflower

Sunflowers can be direct seeded into the garden or started in trays and then transplanted out after 2-3 weeks.

Sunflower ‘Ruby Eclipse’
love in a mist
Love-in-a-Mist ‘Cramer’s Plum’ Photo credit Floret Flowers

Love in a Mist

This is one of the hardiest early bloomers in the garden. Plants dislike being transplanted, so sow seeds directly in the garden in the fall or early spring.

I hope this helps give you an idea as to when you should be planting your different varieties of seeds.

If you have any questions or additional suggestions, feel free to share them in the comments below. And be sure to share this blog post link with anyone who may find these gardening tips useful.

Until next time,

Happy Seed Planning!

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10 Comments

  1. This is my first year to plant a small garden in our new house and even newer raised beds. I love the idea of planting from seed … I’ve never done it. During the two years we lived in Washington I was indoctrinated into the wonders of Floret Farm and can’t wait to see their series on Magnolia Network. Thanks for the wonderful inspiration! xo

    1. I am so impressed that Erin of Floret Farms has grown to what she has. She is so inspiring, and is the reason why I built my greenhouse and raised beds, I was so intimidated by growing seeds, but it’s actually been a lot of fun!

  2. You’ve inspired me to start more flowers from seed this year. I love this list and can’t wait for next week’s post to see how you plan the flower garden. I’ve just ordered some seed catalogues, hope I’m not too late!

    1. You’re not too late at all. I’m sure there are some flower seeds still available and as far as where I live, I don’t even start sowing seeds until the last week of January, first week of February. And most of the flowers I grow are 6 weeks before the last frost date. Ours is April 18th. I’m posting the planning process this week for sure, with some other posts as well.

  3. I think the day that Floret opens their spring sale is better than Black Friday. Last year, the zinnas were stunning, cosmos were tall but not many blooms, sweet peas didn’t do anything, sunflowers were just okay, and snapdragons (which I did on a whim) were absolutely fantastic-on the hot, dry plains of Texas!
    I can’t wait to try it all again and will be stalking your garden and living there vicariously.

    1. I’m looking forward to another planting season Margaret. And I agree with you about Floret opening up their seeds to the public. The good news is that i was able to get some of the seeds already last fall, so I’m ahead of the game. But I am right there waiting for them to show up on their sight. I hope the sweet peas do better for you this year. They have been amazing for me the last 2 years.

  4. Kim these are great tips!!! I’m so excited to start a bunch of these from seed this year albeit a month or so behind you! I can’t wait to see your pretty garden this year!

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