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Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds for Beginners

Are you considering growing a cut flower garden but want the process to be a simple and fun experience? This guide will help you choose some of the easiest flowers to grow indoors from seed, giving you more time to enjoy your cut flower garden.

For beginners, growing flowers from seed can be gratifying. There’s something truly amazing about watching a single seed turn into the most stunning flower.

Follow along for tips on which cut flowers are the easiest to grow, giving you more time and energy to enjoy your cut flower garden rather than work in it all the time!

apricot strawflowers and sweet peas growing in the cut flower garden with greenhouse in background

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I’m a self-taught hobby gardener, not a Master Gardener. Everything I share with you on my blog is my opinion and things that have worked for me.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: lime zinnia and apricot strawflowers growing in the cut flower garden

Here is a list of the easiest flowers to grow from seed indoors. At least they have been for me.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: fuchsia and orange lilliput zinnias

Zinnias are among the most cheerful and easy-to-grow flowers that beginners can start indoors from seed. They’re known for their rapid germination process, with zinnia seeds often sprouting within just 5 to 7 days after planting.

Once they start, zinnias bloom profusely throughout the late summer and into early fall.

When you decide to grow zinnias, there are many varieties of flowers to choose from. Pick from various colorful blooms, including pink, red, yellow, orange, white, and purple. They are a favorite among gardeners looking to add color to their landscapes.

How to Grow Beautiful Zinnias Indoors From Seed

green zinnias with strawflowers in cut flower garden

Zinnias attract a variety of pollinators, such as butterflies and hummingbirds. My favorite thing is to visit the cut flower garden in the early evening and watch the bumble bees sleeping in the zinnia flower heads.

These annual flowers have a relatively quick growth cycle and can bloom from early summer until the first frost, providing long-lasting vibrancy. Their heat and drought tolerance make them ideal for gardeners in warmer climates.

shades of pink zinnias growing in the cut flower garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 as annuals
  • Color Varieties: pink, red, yellow, orange, white, and purple
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun, requiring at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily
  • Soil Needs: best grown in well-draining soil with moderate fertility. While zinnias are adaptable to various soil types, they perform best in soil that is not too rich, as overly fertile soil can encourage more foliage growth at the expense of flowers.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: orange and yellow marigolds growing in the garden

Marigolds (tagetes) are one of the easiest annual flowers. They are resilient and can naturally repel pests like aphids and mosquitos.

While no plant is deer-proof, marigolds have a strong scent that acts as a deterrent to deer. This makes them the perfect companions in vegetable gardens.

These bright flowers also attract beneficial pollinators such as bees and butterflies.

Marigolds thrive in various soil conditions with minimal care, making them an excellent choice for gardeners at any experience level.

dark orange and red colored marigolds growing in the summer garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: yellow, orange, and deep red
  • Sun Exposure: full sun; 6-8 hours of direct sun
  • Soil Needs: grow best in well-draining soil but can tolerate poor soil
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: white and apricot cosmos growing in the cut flower garden

Cosmos (cosmos bipinnatus) are beautiful cut flowers with delicate, daisy-like petals and fern-like foliage that add a whimsical touch to summer bouquets.

Their seeds quickly germinate and grow, transforming their sprouts into blooming plants within a few weeks. They can adapt to various soil conditions, often thriving where other flowers struggle.

Cosmos are drought-tolerant and generally resistant to pests and diseases. With proper care, they will produce abundant flowers from early summer until the first frost.

Beneficial pollinators such as bees and butterflies are attracted to cosmos.

How to Grow Cosmos For Your Cut Flower Garden From Seed Indoors

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: pale cosmos growing in the cut flower garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: white, pink, orange, red, and yellow, as well as varieties that blend these colors
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun, thriving with at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight daily.
  • Soil Needs: Cosmos are not picky about soil and can grow in poor to average, well-draining soil. They prefer a neutral pH but will tolerate a wide range.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: pro cut white lite sunflowers in the garden

Bright and cheerful sunflowers, a symbol of summer, attract pollinators like bees and birds, with their nectar-rich flowers providing a valuable food source.

Mature sunflower seeds are a treat for birds and can be harvested for human consumption.

Sunflowers (helianthus) are known for absorbing toxins from the soil. Their low-maintenance needs are just what a beginner gardener needs when first starting out.

Be sure to support your tall varieties of sunflowers to keep them from falling over and breaking off in the garden.

bright yellow sunflowers in the garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: available in shades of white, pink, orange, red, and yellow.
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun, needing at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight daily.
  • Soil Needs: thrive in poor to average, well-draining soil with a neutral pH but adaptable to different soil types.
pale pink sweet peas growing on garden trellis

The sweet fragrance of these delicate flowers is why these cut flowers are so popular. They’re one of my favorite flowers in the cutting garden.

Old-fashioned sweet pea flowers bloom early and are among the first blooms in the late spring and early summer garden. They’re perfect for vertical gardens and gracefully climbing trellises, fences, and arbors.

Beneficial insects are attracted by sweet peas, contributing to the biodiversity and health of your garden.

One of the reasons why sweet peas (lathyrus odoratus) are one of the easiest flowers to grow from seed indoors is because of their large seeds. They’re so easy to work with and only take a few days to germinate.

These are the first seeds I sow for the season.

From Seed to Bloom: Your Guide for Growing Healthy Sweet Peas

purple and fuchsia sweet peas in the cut flower garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals, with planting times adjusted to ensure they bloom during cooler weather.
  • Color Varieties: pink, purple, red, white, and blue, as well as bi-colors.
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun to partial shade, with cooler areas benefiting from more sun and hotter regions requiring some afternoon shade
  • Soil Needs: thrive in rich, well-draining soil with a neutral to slightly alkaline pH; benefit from the soil being enriched with compost or well-rotted manure before planting.
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Seed Starting Supplies

Check out my favorite supplies and tools for starting seeds indoors. Whether you’re looking for grow lights or a seed starting mix, you’ll find what I use in my own greenhouse.


fuchsia and orange snapdragons growing along the white picket fence garden

These charming flowers are known for their distinctive, dragon-shaped flower heads.

Snapdragons (antirrhinum majus) are excellent cut flowers. They come in various colors, from soft pastels to vibrant hues, and bloom profusely in cooler weather, making them excellent for extending the flowering season in spring and fall gardens.

Butterflies and bees are attracted to snapdragons.

Snapdragons are relatively easy to grow and require minimal maintenance once established, so they’re an excellent flowering plant for experienced gardeners and those just starting a garden for the first time.

How to Sow Snapdragon Seeds Indoors

orange snapdragons growing in the cut flower garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-11, though they can be grown as annuals in cooler zones.
  • Color Varieties: white, yellow, pink, red, orange, peach, purple, and bicolor patterns.
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun but can tolerate partial shade, especially in hotter climates where they appreciate some afternoon shade.
  • Soil Needs: thrive in rich, well-draining soil with a neutral pH. They benefit from adding organic matter at planting time and regular watering to moisten the soil.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: Shasta daisies growing in a cottage style garden

With their bright white petals and sunny yellow centers, Shasta daisies (Leucanthemum × superbum) are known for minimal maintenance requirements. Deadheading these blooms will promote continuous blooming.

Daisies bloom from through the summer, providing a long season of beauty. When I share pictures of my Shasta daisies, I get the same comments every time that they are a “happy” flower.

These garden plants are great for attracting butterflies and other pollinators. But they’re also deer-resistant.

Shasta daisies growing along the white picket fence garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: primarily white petals with yellow centers, although some cultivars may have cream or slightly yellow petals.
  • Sun Exposure: prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, especially in hot climates
  • Soil Needs: Well-draining soil is crucial, with a preference for neutral to slightly acidic pH. They are adaptable to various soil types but perform best in moderately fertile soil.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: bright colored yellow, pink, and red celosia

This colorful and unique flowering plant has the most unique blooms that come in various shapes, including plumes, crests, and spikes.

Celosia (Celosia argentea) is a great choice for gardeners of all levels. They are drought tolerant once established, which is especially beneficial in hot and dry climates.

Pollinators like bees and butterflies are attracted to these beautiful flowers. With its ability to withstand heat and keep blooming profusely throughout the summer and into fall, celosia is the perfect flower to grow to add long-lasting color and texture to your garden.

celosia growing in the garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: generally grown as an annual but can be perennial in USDA Zones 10-12.
  • Color Varieties: red, pink, orange, yellow, and purple
  • Sun Exposure: Prefers full sun for optimal growth and flowering.
  • Soil Needs: Thrives in well-draining, moderately fertile soil with a neutral pH. While celosia is adaptable to various soil conditions, it performs best with regular watering and good drainage to prevent root rot.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds calendula

Known for their medicinal properties, calendula flowers are used in creams, oils, and teas to soothe skin irritations and promote healing. It’s also edible and can be added to salads and other dishes for a splash of color and a peppery taste.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a cold-tolerant annual that can bloom from early spring through fall, and in mild winter climates, it may even flower during the winter months.

With its ability to attract beneficial insects and how easy it is to care for, calendula is perfect for vegetable gardens, borders, and companion planting.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: yellow and orange, with some varieties offering deeper hues and even bicolor patterns.
  • Sun Exposure: prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, especially in hot climates where afternoon shade can prevent wilting.
  • Soil Needs: Grows best in well-draining soil with moderate fertility. Calendula is adaptable to various soil types but prefers a neutral to slightly acidic pH. Regular watering is appreciated, though the plant is quite drought-tolerant once established.
blue flowered bachelor's button or cornflower growing in the garden

Bachelor’s Buttons (Centaurea cyanus), also known as Cornflower, are a charming addition to flower beds with vibrant and delicate blooms in shades of blue, pink, purple, and white.

These are very easy flowers to grow indoors from seed and are known for their ability to thrive in poor soil conditions. I was surprised to see my blue flowers self-seed the following year, growing through the cracks in my pavers and with no water source.

Bachelor’s Button plants are drought-tolerant once established, requiring minimal care and watering. Their nectar-rich flowers attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies.

Cornflowers make excellent cut flowers with a long vase life. They can also be used in dried flower arrangements, retaining their color and shape well after drying.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: purple bachelor's button or cornflower
  • USDA Growing Zone: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: blue, pink, purple, and white.
  • Sun Exposure: prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade
  • Soil Needs: thrives in poor to average, well-draining soil. Bachelor’s Button is not fussy about soil pH and can grow in various soil conditions, though it prefers a neutral to slightly alkaline pH.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: California poppies

These drought-tolerant plants thrive in dry conditions. California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) are known for their ability to self-sow, ensuring a continual display of color year after year with minimal effort.

These poppies attract a variety of pollinators, including bees and butterflies. Their resilience to poor soil and drought conditions makes these flowers perfect for low-maintenance gardens.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-10 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: orange, yellow, red, pink, and white
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun.
  • Soil Needs: thrive in poor to average, well-draining soil. They are drought-tolerant and prefer a neutral to slightly alkaline soil pH
yellow black-eyed Susans in a barrel growing in the garden

Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta) are an amazing perennial that brings a touch of wildflower charm to any garden.

Known for their golden-yellow petals and dark brown centers, these flowers symbolize late summer and early fall, blooming from June to September.

Black-eyed Susans are incredibly resilient, thriving in various conditions and requiring minimal care once established. This hardiness makes them an excellent option for gardeners looking for low-maintenance plants.

They attract a variety of pollinators, including bees and butterflies, and their seeds provide a food source for birds in the winter, adding to the biodiversity of your outdoor space.

black-eyed Susans growing in the garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: perennials in garden zones 3-9
  • Color Varieties: predominantly golden-yellow petals with a dark brown or black center, though some cultivars may feature shades of orange, red, and bronze
  • Sun Exposure: Prefer full sun but can tolerate partial shade
  • Soil Needs: adaptable to a wide range of soil types but prefer well-draining soil
colorful pansies growing in garden flower containers

These hardy flowers are a great choice for the cooler months of early spring and fall and, in some regions, throughout the winter, bringing cheer to the garden when most other plants are dormant.

Pansies (Viola × wittrockiana) have an excellent tolerance for cold weather, perfect for extending the blooming season. They’re also edible, with a mild, sweet-grassy flavor, making them a colorful addition to salads and desserts.

These flowering plants attract pollinators like butterflies. With their low maintenance needs and the ability to thrive in cooler temperatures, pansies are a fantastic option for gardeners looking to add long-lasting color and interest to their outdoor spaces.

pansies growing in cell trays in the greenhouse
  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-11 grown as annuals, often as cool-weather annuals in fall and spring.
  • Color Varieties: purple, blue, red, orange, yellow, white, and bi-colors.
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun to partial shade, with afternoon shade beneficial in warmer climates.
  • Soil Needs: thrive in rich, well-draining soil with a slightly acidic to neutral pH.
apricot strawflowers growing in the white picket fence garden overlooking the greenhouse

What I love most about these easy flowers is their paper-like consistency, making them beautiful while in bloom and perfect for dried floral arrangements, retaining their color and shape long after being picked.

Strawflowers (Xerochrysum bracteatum) are drought-tolerant plants ideal for gardeners looking for low-maintenance options that still offer a high impact. Strawflowers thrive in hot, dry conditions, perfect for sunny spots where other plants might struggle.

Their ability to withstand poor soil and drought conditions makes them resilient to challenging garden environments.

Strawflowers attract pollinators like bees and butterflies. Their long blooming season, from summer through fall, ensures your garden remains vibrant for months.

How to Grow Strawflowers For Your Cut Flower Garden From Seed Indoors

strawflowers growing in the cut flower garden
  • USDA Growing Zones: 9-11 as perennial flowers but can be grown as annuals in cooler zones.
  • Color Varieties: yellow, orange, pink, red, and white
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun
  • Soil Needs: thrive in well-draining soil; tolerant of poor soil conditions. They prefer a slightly acidic to neutral pH but are adaptable to various soil types
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: purple larkspurs growing in the cut flower garden

Larkspur (genus Delphinium) is a stunning addition to any garden, with its towering spikes of delicate flowers and offering height and color.

These annuals, part of the Delphinium family, bloom in early to mid-summer with shades of blue, purple, pink, and white.

Larkspur is particularly valued for its ability to add vertical interest to garden beds and borders, creating a visually striking backdrop for other plants.

Its flowers attract a variety of pollinators, including bees and butterflies. Larkspur is also an excellent choice for cut flower gardens with its sturdy stems and vibrant blooms.

They are easy to grow from seed and tend to self-sow, making it a low-maintenance option for gardeners.

Larkspur does have toxic properties which require careful handling.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals
  • Color Varieties: blue, purple, pink, and white
  • Sun Exposure: prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade in hotter climates
  • Soil Needs: Thrives in rich, well-draining soil with a neutral to slightly alkaline pH
sweet alyssum growing in the garden

Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritime) has delicate honey-scented flowers that form a low, dense carpet of color from spring through fall and is drought-tolerant.

This easy-to-grow annual (perennial in USDA zones 9-11) has tiny, clustered flowers in shades of white, pink, purple, and yellow.

Sweet Alyssum attracts beneficial insects, including bees and butterflies, and its rapid growth and self-seeding nature make it a low-maintenance choice for busy gardeners.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 grown as annuals and as a perennial in zones 9-11
  • Color Varieties: white, pink, purple, and yellow
  • Sun Exposure: Prefers full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Needs: Thrives in well-draining soil with moderate fertility. Sweet Alyssum is adaptable to various soil types but performs best with regular watering, especially in hot, dry conditions
purple coneflower growing in the cottage garden

Coneflowers (Echinacea spp.) are native North American perennials with various vibrant blooms, including shades of purple, pink, red, yellow, and white, and sturdy stems with lance-shaped leaves.

These flowers attract pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and birds, especially goldfinches. Their long blooming period, from early summer through fall, provides color and life to the garden when many other plants begin to fade.

Echinacea plants are known for their resilience, thriving in hot, dry conditions and showing remarkable drought tolerance once established.

They’re also valued for their herbal properties, with Echinacea being used to boost the immune system.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: reddish orange coneflower
  • USDA Growing Zones: hardy perennial in USDA Zones 3-9
  • Color Varieties:  purple, pink, red, yellow, and white, with many cultivars available that offer a range of hues and flower forms.
  • Sun Exposure: prefer full sun but can tolerate partial shade; however, they bloom most prolifically in full sun
  • Soil Needs: thrive in well-draining soil with average to low fertility; are adaptable to a range of soil conditions but perform best in soil that is not overly rich, as too much fertility can lead to weaker stems and fewer blooms.
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‘Growing a Cut Flower Garden’ Series


view of the greenhouse indoors

Growing flowers from seed allows gardeners to get a head start on the growing season. Here’s a guide on beginning this journey, from gathering supplies to transplanting your seedlings outdoors.

  • Seeds: Choose easy-to-grow varieties for your first time growing seeds indoors.
  • Seed Starting Mix: Use a light, well-draining seed starting mix to ensure your seeds have the best environment for germination.
  • Containers: Seed trays or small pots with drainage holes are ideal. You can also use peat pots or make your own from recycled materials.
  • Light Source: A sunny windowsill or grow lights will provide the necessary light for seedlings to grow strong.
  • Watering Can Tray Without Holes: Seedlings must be kept moist, not waterlogged. Bottom watering will hydrate your young plants without disturbing the soil or seeds.
  • Labels and Marker: Keep track of what you’ve planted by labeling each container with the plant’s name and the sowing date.
  • Heating Mat and Humidity Lid (Optional): These supplies can improve germination rates for some flower types.

For more information, read my blog post, ” Supplies for Successfully Sowing Cut Flower Seeds Indoors.”

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: tray with seed starting mix and humidity dome
  • Prepare Your Containers: Fill your containers with the seed starting mix, leaving some space at the top. Moisten the mix with water until it’s damp but not soggy.
  • Sow Seeds: Follow the instructions on the flower seed packets for sowing depth and spacing. Some seeds need light to germinate and should be sown on the soil’s surface, while others need to be covered lightly with soil.
  • Cover and Place in Light: If you don’t have a dome or humidity lid, cover your seed containers with plastic wrap to retain moisture until germination. Place the containers under grow lights or on a sunny windowsill. Monitor daily, ensuring the soil remains moist.
  • Ventilation and Care: Remove the plastic cover once seeds germinate to allow air circulation. Keep the soil moist and provide 12-16 hours of light daily.
  • Thinning: When seedlings develop their first true leaves, thin them out if they are too crowded. This ensures the remaining plants have enough space to grow.

For more in-depth information about how to sow your flower seeds indoors, read my blog post “Growing Cut Flowers from Seed: Seed Starting 101“.

transplanting seedlings in the garden
  • Harden Off Seedlings: About a week before planting outdoors, begin hardening off your seedlings. This process involves gradually exposing them to outdoor conditions to reduce shock. Start with an hour a day and increase the exposure time gradually.
  • Choose the Right Time: Transplant after the last frost date in your area when the soil is warm. Evening or an overcast day is the best time to transplant to prevent sun shock.
  • Transplanting: Carefully remove the seedlings from their containers, trying not to disturb the roots. Peat pots can be planted directly into the soil. Dig a hole in your garden for each seedling, place it in, and gently fill it with soil. Water the transplants thoroughly.
  • Aftercare: Keep the soil moist and support taller plants if necessary. A layer of mulch in the garden bed can help retain moisture and suppress weeds.
sweet pea seedlings in the greenhouse

Growing flowers from seed offers numerous benefits and can be incredibly rewarding for gardeners of all skill levels. Here are several reasons why it’s worth considering.

Buying seeds is generally more economical than purchasing mature plants or seedlings from a nursery.

A single packet of annual flower seeds can grow dozens of plants for a fraction of the cost of buying the same number of grown plants.

bright colored flowers growing in the summer cut flower garden

When you grow from seeds, you can choose from a much wider variety of flowers than you might find at your local garden center.

This includes heirloom varieties and new hybrids. You can select plants based on color, height, bloom time, and other characteristics to create a customized garden that meets your preferences.

Growing your own flowers from seeds allows you to control the environment and conditions in which they grow. This can lead to healthier, more strong plants.

Seedlings can be more resilient and better adapted to the conditions in your garden since they’re raised in an environment where they will continue to grow.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: trays of seedlings growing inside the greenhouse

There is a true sense of accomplishment and satisfaction in watching seeds you’ve planted sprout and grow into beautiful flowers.

Starting seeds indoors can extend your growing season, especially in cooler climates.

By sowing seeds indoors while it’s still cold outside, you can get a head start on spring and enjoy blooms earlier than if you waited to plant outdoors.

Growing flowers from seeds can contribute to your garden’s biodiversity. Many flowers benefit pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, and birds.

By selecting a variety of plants that flower at different times, you can provide a continuous source of nectar and pollen throughout the growing season.

cut flower garden evening summer view overlooking the bay

Starting flower seeds indoors before transplanting them outside can give gardeners a significant head start on the growing season, especially in regions with shorter growing periods.

This method is particularly beneficial for flowers that have a longer germination time, require controlled conditions for sprouting, or come from plants that need more time to mature and bloom.

Here are some types of flower seeds that are commonly started indoors.

Slow-Growing Perennials

These plants often take a long time to germinate and grow to a transplantable size. Starting them indoors allows for an earlier bloom, sometimes in their first year, which might not be possible otherwise.

Examples include lavender, echinacea (coneflower), and delphinium.

Tender Annuals

These flowers can’t tolerate frost and need a head start indoors for a more extended flowering period before the first frost of fall.

Examples include petunias, marigolds, impatiens, and begonias.

Plants with Long Growing Seasons

Some plants need a longer growing season than what their natural climate provides.

Starting seeds indoors ensures they reach maturity and have time to bloom. Examples include geraniums, snapdragons, and lobelia.

Warm-Season Flowers

These flowers thrive in warm weather and should only be planted outside after all danger of frost has passed.

Starting them indoors can give them a healthy start. Examples include zinnias, cosmos, and sunflowers (in cooler climates).

Flowers with Delicate Seedlings

Some plants, like foxglove and columbine, have delicate seedlings that grow better under the controlled conditions of indoor growing.

Being indoors provides them with careful monitoring and protection from harsh weather.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: sweet pea seedlings growing in the greenhouse

While many flowers can be started indoors to get a head start on the growing season, other flowers need the direct sow approach.

The ability to start flowers indoors depends on several factors, including the plant’s growth habits, root system, and sensitivity to transplanting.

Here are some things to consider when choosing to start flowers indoors versus sowing directly outdoors.

Flowers Suitable for Indoor Starting

  • Tender annuals and perennials benefit from being started indoors in regions with short growing seasons. Examples include petunias, impatiens, and tomatoes.
  • Slow-growing plants, such as lavender and geraniums, take a long time to germinate and reach transplant size and are good candidates for indoor starting.
  • Plants sensitive to cold are protected from frost, which gives them a head start when starting them indoors, especially in cooler climates.

Flowers Best Sown Directly Outdoors

  • Plants with Deep or Fragile Root Systems: Some plants do not transplant well due to deep taproots or delicate root systems that are easily disturbed. Direct sowing minimizes root disturbance. Examples include poppies, lupines, and sunflowers.
  • Fast-Growing, Hardy Annuals: These plants can quickly catch up even if sown directly outdoors after the last frost. They often prefer not to be disturbed once planted. Examples include nasturtiums, cosmos, and zinnias.
  • Self-Sowing Flowers: Flowers known to self-sow or naturalize in the garden, such as calendula and forget-me-nots, are usually better off being sown directly where they are to grow, as they can quickly spread on their own.

General Considerations for Choosing Indoor Seed Starting

  • Space and Care: Starting seeds indoors requires space, proper lighting, and consistent care, including watering, temperature control, and sometimes additional equipment like grow lights or heating mats.
  • Transplant Shock: Some plants are more susceptible to transplant shock than others. For these, direct sowing is preferable to avoid the stress of moving them from indoors to outdoors.
  • Timing: When starting seeds indoors, it’s crucial to time the sowing correctly so plants are ready to be transplanted outdoors after the risk of frost has passed but are not kept indoors so long they become leggy or outgrow their containers.
Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds

The timing for starting flower seeds indoors largely depends on your local climate and the specific requirements of the plants you intend to grow.

The goal is to have your seedlings ready to transplant outdoors after the danger of frost has passed, yet mature enough to survive the transition. Here’s how to determine the best time to start your seeds indoors.

The most important thing you need to know before sowing flower seeds is the expected last frost date for your area.

This date varies depending on your geographic location. You can find this information through local gardening clubs, agricultural extension offices, or online gardening resources.

Most seed packets will give a timeline of when to start seeds indoors, usually showing how many weeks before the last frost date.

These instructions consider the average germination time and growth rate of the seedlings.

Once you know the last frost date and the recommended start time from the seed packet, count backward from the frost date to determine when to sow your seeds indoors.

For example, if your last frost date is April 30 and your seeds should be started six weeks before the last frost, you would start your seeds around mid-March.

zinnia seedlings in the greenhouse: Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds

Fast-growing plants like marigolds and zinnias may need only 4-6 weeks indoors before they’re ready to transplant.

Slower-growing plants like petunias and impatiens might benefit from 8-10 weeks of indoor growth before moving outside.

Weather can be unpredictable, so it’s wise to monitor local weather forecasts as your transplant date approaches.

If an unexpected frost is predicted, you may need to delay transplanting or protect your seedlings outdoors with covers.

Keep a gardening journal to record when you start your seeds and how well they adapt to transplanting. Over time, you’ll fine-tune the timing based on your specific conditions and experiences.

Easy Cut Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seeds: greenhouse and white picket fence cut flower garden
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Garden Supplies and Tools

Check out my favorite garden supplies and tools for the growing season. Whether you’re looking for potting soil or deer repellent, you’ll find what I use in my own garden.


By selecting easy-to-grow flower varieties, using the right supplies, and following basic indoor starting techniques, even new gardeners can enjoy a beautiful flower garden with minimal effort.

The key to success comes with understanding the specific needs of each plant, timing your seed starting correctly, and having patience as you watch your garden come to life.

I hope you found favorites from my “Easy Flowers to Grow Indoors from Seed” list. Comment below and tell me what you’ll plant in your gardens this growing season.

Be sure to share this blog post link with anyone who may find these gardening tips useful.

Until next time,

Happy Gardening!

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